Yearly Archives: 2015

Happy New Years Eve!


 

Only hours until those transitional 10 seconds that lead us into the New Year. What have you done differently this year compared to the last? Did you uphold your end of the deal to practice a consistent workout routine, to eat healthier, or to spend more time outdoors? Or did new resolutions arise as this year began to age? Lets take a minute to think back on this year and reflect on all that we have accomplished.NYResolutions

It’s tradition to set goals with a new coming year in order to make change and to better ourselves as individuals. A fresh start is what most interpret the New Year to be, and many take advantage of setting up check points in order to steer ourselves towards success. As human beings, we only want to enhance ourselves so that we can embrace the maximum that life can give each of us individually and simply enjoy it with peace. This whole resolution phenomenon is said to have began back with the ancient Babylonians. It was believed among the people that in order to have a good year and be in good status with the gods that they would make promises that needed to be fulfilled in order to pay respects to those above them.

As you are looking back on 2015 and all the doors that you have walked through, focus on the growth you’ve succeeded within yourself. The goals you’ve reached. The transitions you’ve made. Focus on the people and the experiences that have taken you from the moment that glass, shimmering ball hit zero seconds on January 1st to the person you are right now in the present, both good and bad. Don’t reject the bad, but accept it and learn for growth is a natural process that shouldn’t be fought. Whether you know it or now, you’re a different person from once this year began. Use all that you have gained to help you make new resolutions for the upcoming year.

Here at CIMI and Catalina Sea Camp, we all make resolutions in order to make our time here the best that it can be, whether it’s related to making ourselves better educators or conservationists on this island, or even to make us better hosts for the students and campers who visit us.

The most important message to take this is to set yourself up for success. Make goals that will optimize your happiness and experiences in life. If you’re aware of things that need change, make goals that will help you find resolution and lead you towards feeling ultimate in the end. We hope to see you soon next year in 2016!!!

Written by: John Cornett

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/new-years
Photo Credits – http://thecenterforfamilies.com/keeping-your-new-years-resolutions/

Join Us on Visitor’s Day

Are you a parent who wishes Catalina Sea Camp was for adults? Don’t worry, you’re not alone… But, on the last Sunday of each 3-week summer session Catalina Sea Camp opens its doors (or lowers the pier ramp) and welcomes parents and friends of current campers to Toyon Bay. Not only is a good way to visit the students at camp who you’ve missed, it is a great day to experience what camp has to offer for yourself!

IMG_8165

The instructors and counselors are available to mingle, the food is always top-notch, and the activities are endless. Paddle-boarding, snorkeling, kayaking, rock-climbing, and visiting the touch tanks are just some of the exciting things to do! Campers look forward to showing off their art projects, ROVs, marine knowledge, and new water skills when visitor day finally arrives. Once you get to Avalon there are shoreboats that leave throughout the day to bring you to our incredible facility at Toyon Bay.

To find out more information, check out: https://catalinaseacamp.org/sea-camp-parents/faqs/

IMG_8218Written By: Jaclyn Lucas

 

Michael Muller Comes to Sea Camp!


This summer the amazing Michael Muller visited us at Catalina Sea Camp. Over the years Michael has traveled all over the world and has captured some pretty spectacular images. Whether it’s shooting movie posters, famous celebrities, or epic ocean creatures Michael has lived quite the adventurous life. Recently Michael has been using his photography to show people the amazing creatures that live in our oceans, in particular sharks.

IMG_8987Over the years sharks have not developed the best reputation. You never hear them described as cute and adorable, more like dangerous man-eaters. But did you know that only about 6 people are killed by sharks every year? And in the United States only about 1 person every other year will be killed by a shark? Compared to the billions of people that live on our planet is that number really that big? No! But sharks continue to be viewed as the bad guys.

Did you now that vending machines are more dangerous than sharks?! Yes its true, in the United States vending machines kill an average of 12 people every single year. That’s insane! Want to now something that’s even crazier? Selfies have killed more people this year than sharks. You should be more afraid of taking a selfie than you should be of a shark. But because the media continues to portray sharks as evil, man eating monsters sharks continue to have a horrible reputation.

IMG_9015

As a result Michael has been on a mission to use his photography in hopes of promoting shark conservation and changing peoples perceptions about sharks. After spending time documenting sharks both in and out of the cage Michael has successfully captured and shared the beauty of sharks.

Author: Alex Feltes

Halloween: 9 Steps to Zombie Apocalypse

Are you ready for Halloween because we are at Sea Camp? We have overrun by Zombies for the Night of the Living Dead dance party. Part of the basketball court got closed off and converted into a hazard zone emulating everything zombie. The campers then got transformed into their undead selves and spent the evening eating snacks, playing games, and dancing away. What kind of zombie would you be? Now you can find out how we did it.

Here are the 9 Steps to create your very own Zombie Apocalypse.

Materials to turn undead:
Liquid Latex
Makeup sponges
Single-ply toilet paper (or double-ply split apart)
Fake blood
Black face paint (to really add that sense of decay)
Hair dryer or safe heat source for drying (optional)

9 Steps to Zombie Apocalypse:
1. Apply layer of liquid latex to desired part of face with makeup sponge. Let dry until nearly clear.
2. Repeat step one, two or three times. Let each layer dry.
3. Apply layer of liquid latex to same part of face, pat toilet paper onto wet latex. Let dry.
4. Remove excess toilet paper around edges. Apply latex over toilet paper.
5. Repeat steps three and four, two or three times. Let dry.
6. Pull and tug at raised parts of latex to create skin lesions and tears.
7. Shadow the latex, and inside edges of lesions with black face paint.
8. Apply fake blood to desired result.
9. Enjoy Sea Camp zombie night.

Early Bird Incentive Ends SOON!

Don’t Miss Out on All this FUN!

Sign up before December 31st, 2015 and SAVE $$$$!

Register HERE

Catalina Sea Camp • One-Week Sessions

Coed Ages 8 – 13

One-Week Session 1:  June 11 – June 17           $1,450 ($1,600 after 12/31/15)
One-Week Session 2:  June 18 – June 24           $1,550 ($1,700 after 12/31/15)
One-Week Session 3:  June 25 – July 1               $1,550 ($1,700 after 12/31/15)

*Please note: Catalina Sea Camp One-Week Sessions run from Saturday to Friday

Space is limited in some sessions.  A NON-REFUNDABLE deposit of $200.00 is required to register. Register HERE

Catalina Sea Camp • Three-Week Sessions

Coed Ages 12 – 17

Three-Week Session 71:  July 3 – July 22          $4,150 ($4,400 after 12/31/15)
Three-Week Session 72:  July 24 – August 12   $4,150 ($4,400 after 12/31/15)

Space is limited in some sessions. NON-REFUNDABLE deposit of $200 is required to register. Register HERE

*Please note: Catalina Sea Camp Three-Week Sessions run from Sunday to Friday

Applying and Registration 

All of our camp sessions fill up very quickly, so APPLY EARLY!   For additional information or questions, please contact us.

Phone: 800.645.1423 or 909.625.6194
Fax: 909.625.9977 or 909.625.7305
Catalina Sea Camp • P. O. Box 1360 • Claremont, CA 91711
Email: Sea Camp Registrar
Office Hours: 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM (Lunch 12:30-1:00)

CHECK OUT SOME MORE OF THE FUN!!!

 

Camp = Adventures in Growing up

In the summer of 1987 a lot was going on. Astronomers at University of California discovered the of birth of a galaxy, Stars camp; Stripes brought the America’s Cup back to home to the US, and I was going to Catalina Sea Camp at Toyon Bay. My main ambition to go to camp was to get my junior certification in SCUBA, the rest was trivial in my young mind. Nevertheless, I was pretty apprehensive about the camp experience, let alone being away from my family. Who knew what to expect? I had friends back home, I was already a big fish in a small pond, and now I had to swim in the open waters of meeting new people? Ugh!

Let’s step back to where it all began. In 1985, my father owned an airplane, a Cessena 182 based out of Oceanside, CA and Ross needed a ride to Mexico. Permission slip in hand, and homework in flight, we took Ross Turner, founder of CIMI camp down to the Sea of Cortez to supervise a 7/8th grade school trip in a small town called Bahia de Los Angeles (unfortunately Guided Discoveries no longer offers this program). Arturo, our guide and owner of the Ridley’s and Leatherback Turtle farm Sanctuary took us by the hand for a tour of night snorkeling and daily nearby island tours. The school kids stayed in a large hostel bunk style. Each kid learned the rudimentary means to hoof 5 gallon buckets of sea water from the ocean to the toilets a 100 yards away, gross. Once, a strong girl came up behind a struggling boy and ripped that bucket from his hands, “woman-handling” 5 gallons to the toilet. Ok.

disclosures (1)

We explored multiple islands with marine ecology and inter-tidal zones, along with night dives right off our porch. That particular night snorkeling adventure, we came across a Tiger Eel and various marine species. Arturo, our guide, shared his turtle sanctuary and turtle hatchlings from would be poachers. For a kid, this was unimaginable. We were inundated with knowledge and inspiration. Of course, I was two years younger, while these kids were in 8th grade. I had a few years of growing up before I was old enough to go to sea camp.

disclosures (3)

We returned from that trip with a short flight stop to Toyon Bay on Catalina Island’s famous steep runway. Not for the faint hearted! There we met Jean-Michel Cousteau and his wind turbine boat, the Alcyone. We also met Environmental that was there to re-introduce the Bald Eagle to Catalina Island. What an experience! Shark cages on the Alcyone and baby Bald Eagles flying over Catalina. Several months later we were “channel surfing” as we do at home on the tube. National Geographic on assignment was featured on TV and there was the story of Jean-Michel Cousteau and the Bald Eagles, not to mention Kristy’s bright face with Ross and CIMI camp in tow.  They filmed CIMI camp with kids working their masks and snorkles, and I distinctly remember a beautiful arial shot of Toyon Bay and Catalina Island. After an adventure like this, who could resist going to Sea Camp, right?

disclosures

disclosures (2)

At 12 years old, I could barely fit into the scuba equipment, let alone my wetsuit. I was a small guy with big ambitions. Catalina Sea Camp at Toyon Bay was such a big place for my little body. We were engulfed by a small canyon, filled with roaming Buffalo on the soccer field, along with housing, class buildings, and administration around the campus. The place was buzzing with tons of new exploring. We developed a routine, much like school, but it was fun. Eating, classes, and fun campfire story telling filled the voids. The girls were looking pretty- we had a dance night and made best friends forever. The 4th of July we hiked to the side of the hill to watch the fireworks as far as the eye could see on the mainland. One night there was a campfire with a story of E-ot-tsu. Later on in life I only remember that it became later morphed to that with Harry the Killer whale. My least favorite experience turned out to be the nurse. She was the sweetest person, but she ultimately crushed my dreams. My first try at diving I was totally geared up, and Nurse Rachet stopped me cold feet. I had asthma. Although I had a permission slip from my doctor, it didn’t help and they were not about to take the risk. I was told I could not SCUBA at the camp, but I could be in sailing class. My eyes wet and red, I couldn’t believe it. There was nothing worse that someone tearing away at your dreams, at least from my perspective. But, even the worst experiences turn out to be the best stories. It wasn’t until later at camp I became best friends with her daughter that attended the camp at the same time. Today, we are all still very good friends, even nurse Rachet!

Sailing into the Sea Camp Family

I joined the Sea Camp sail staff in 2012 after USC’s School of Cinematic Arts accepted me into their Film and Television Production program. Before coming to Catalina, I worked for ten years as the Assistant Sail Director for a day camp in Coconut Grove, Florida for children ages 7-13. I also sailed competitively throughout high school, traveling around the country to various regattas.

My first summer on the island was filled with new experiences, exciting adventures, and lifelong friendships. I earned the sail name Ripple Dill my very first week at camp after reading a label on a bucket and it immediately became part of my identity. Check these camper sail names: What would your sail be?

It has been an incredible privilege to be part of the sail staff and we have created our own little family. We collaborate to create the safest and most enjoyable program possible for our campers, we plan trips together for our days off, and reunite regularly when we are off the island. In particular, the Tubbs family, who have had all three of their children work at Toyon Bay, have welcomed me into their family, which is a great resource for someone from the east coast.

Ripple Dill

I have also enjoyed watching our campers share my passion for sailing and grow from children into young adults. This past spring, one of my favorite sailors was accepted to my alma mater, Bowdoin College, and will be attending in the fall. When I return to Los Angeles at the end of the summer, I will graduate from my masters program and plan to pursue a career at a talent agency. I know that the lessons that I have learned here will serve me well for the rest of my life and Toyon Bay will always be a place that I call home.

Rippledill

Art Shack DIY

Running a summer art program for kids can be a challenging balance game. Keeping campers entertained and interested while keeping projects simple and relatively mess free is the ultimate goal, and I always try to mix things up so our returning campers aren’t doing the same projects year after year! I’ve done tie-dye and bleach out shirts, tiles, clay, watercolor, shrinky-dinks, silk painting and more, but I’ve always wanted to do a batik project.

Batik is the process of dying intricate designs on fabric using hot wax to block out shapes while dying the fabric with various colors. Hot wax is a tricky thing to use and keep track of when working with kids, and the materials can be expensive though, so I have strayed away from it in the past. This year however I have tried a different version of batik that is simple and kid friendly! We made a batik design on bandanas and they turned out great!

Materials:

  • plain white bandana
  • bottle of washable Elmer’s Glue
  • Acrylic paint, paint brushes, and water

That’s it!

Step One: On scratch paper, lay out a design for your batik. It could be words, images, or just a cool line design. Sky’s the limit! Just think about how you want to add color and what your design will look like in the end. Once you’ve perfected your design on paper, you’re ready for the real thing!

Step Two: Using the bottle of Elmer’s glue, draw out your design on your bandana. Be careful not to make thick lines of glue or heavy dots. You want your lines to be thin and steady across the surface of the fabric.

IMG_9887

Step Three: Let the glue dry in the sun and work on something else!

IMG_9913

Backup projects are a huge part of the Art Shack at camp. Things like jewelry or friendship bracelets, lanyards, coloring book pages, etc. are important to have ready while projects dry or if a camper isn’t particularly involved in the project you are doing. Check out this video of another simple project that we do at camp.

Step Four: Now that the glue is dry (about 30 minutes or so of drying time), it’s time to paint! Using acrylic paint, add water to the palette to really water the paint down a bit. This makes it much easier to spread across the fabric and gives the finished project a cool, lighter effect. Cover the entire face of the fabric in paint putting colors wherever you’d like, and there’s no need to avoid the glue lines- you can paint right over the top of them! Again, reminder that you do not need heavy paint on the bandana- the lighter the layer, the better it will look and the easier it will dry.

You may want to cover your surface with paper for the paint portion, since the fabric is thin and tends to soak through onto your working surface. (You don’t want to put paper underneath for the wet glue portion however, as the glue will soak through and dry to the paper, eventually taking the paper with it when you pick up the bandana. It is easier to pull the fabric off of the table surface and wipe it down after you are finished to get rid of any glue that may have stuck to the table.)

Step Five: Let the paint dry (acrylic dries rather quickly). Once it is completely dry, throw your bandana in a wash cycle with cold water and tumble dry on low. This sets the paint in, washes the glue off of the bandana and leaves thin white lines wherever your glue was, exposing the original design you made! It also softens the fabric so now you are ready to use your bandana or display it somewhere for it to be admired!  Voila!

IMG_2073

Science in Action

Hi! I’m Emily Davidson, and I’m on the Science & Adventure staff at Toyon Bay.

IMG_1760

 

Four years ago when I started college, I could have never imagined ending up in such an exquisite place as this. Rugged, picturesque Catalina is the best classroom I could ever ask for, with an abundance of resources for hands-on learning, adventure, and, of course, fun.

As my primarily research-focused undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill were wrapping up, I began questioning many aspects of my education. As a chemistry major who focused on chemical oceanography (the study of chemical processes that occur within marine ecosystems) I found my passion for science and discovery through hands-on, relevant experiments and excursions in my classes and research laboratory. I realized I was incredibly lucky to have had such a supportive and immersive education – something that far too few students have the opportunity to experience.

Every time I told someone I was a chemistry major, I got a nearly universal reaction of disgust and “why would you do that to yourself?!” A lot of people dislike science, especially once they reach the high school and collegiate level. I believe this is because so few people get to experience hands-on, interactive, relevant science activities at a young age. With the challenges our growing world faces in the future, it is essential that the next generation of scientists be prepared and passionate about facing those challenges and answering the questions that need to be answered.

CIMI’s summer sea camps and school year programs are providing a stellar service to kids of all different backgrounds by exposing them to an amazing facet of this earth they may otherwise never experience. After struggling to decide what I wanted to do after graduation, it became clearer and clearer that CIMI was the perfect place to make a difference in kids’ lives and the future. CIMI has a fantastic staff that is teaching kids in ways that truly engage them and bridge the gap between academics that many students perceive as unimportant by making nature the classroom, and by bundling fun and interactive learning to inspire kids to follow their interests and discover the amazing beauty and chaos of our natural world, and, most importantly, pushing them to dream, ask questions, and change the world.

Check out our Catalina Sea Camp science in action:

Trying Something New in the USA

Sometimes you have to just got to get out and try something new! Some of our campers are nervous to even think about diving in a couple years. Our scuba in a bucket class gives them a small glance into what going diving might be like.

Trying something new like going diving or even coming to Catalina Sea Camp can be a challenging experience. Sometimes even our staff has the same nerves about coming to camp as the campers do. Check out these two stories from our loved international staff.

WOW Surfs Up at Catalina Sea Camp

Igor

All my life, I have spent traveling Europe, surfing different spots, going back home to Portugal to see family and close friends. In all that time I never dreamed a place like Toyon Bay and Catalina Sea Camp could exist. I still remember walking out of the airport doors at LAX and thinking to myself; ‘this is a different world’.

I grew up with a bunch of younger cousins (14 to be precise) and I have always had a blast playing with them and coaching them in they’re life experiences. I love it! It’s such a nice feeling to have when you know you have made that small change in a child’s life. Seeing them smile when they have accomplished something like when my little 7 year old cousin, Tiago caught his first wave! His smile was priceless. The feeling is something that cannot be explained, however I knew at that moment I wanted to coach the sport I love which is surfing and I wanted to help kids achieve they’re potential in activities they enjoy. Possibly even show them new sports or activities that they might love the rest of their lives. Thankfully, I am in the right job for that and it’s the job I have here at Catalina Sea Camp.

I got myself through a surfing academy and got my instructors qualification to coach surfing. I have been doing it for a few years now, coaching new students at my university and coaching clients back home in Portugal. But I never knew I would get the opportunity to come to such an amazing place like Catalina Sea Camp to do what I love.

The amount of activities I have done since arriving at Catalina Sea Camp, well I’ve lost count. The amount of times I have had to step out of my comfort zone (eg. Touching sharks for the first time or diving to depths I never thought I could) has been more than I can remember but believe me, I would do it over and over again because CIMI has given me so much in the past month and I will be doing everything to give back to them. It is so much fun playing with the kids out in the water or climbing with them on the climbing wall. It’s a great feeling to have knowing that I am showing them a great time at Toyon Bay and seeing they’re smiles and making new friends is awesome!

My adventure here at Catalina Sea Camp has only just begun, I have met some great and friendly bunch of people who I can call friends. I look forward to so much more learning both for me and the children who attend Catalina Sea Camp. Here’s to summer and here’s to Catalina Sea Camp!

Igor 

The Girl from Africa, Lands at Catalina Sea Camp.

IMG_1757

It all started when I had the urge to travel and go overseas. I went on to the internet and searched…”work at summer camps in the USA”. I came across an agency that ultimately helped me get this job. Paul “Butterkup” Kupferman, contacted me through this agency. When I got the first email from him I was super excited but also very nervous. I had an online interview, because of course, I was in South Africa and he was in California. I knew my skills and qualifications in Culinary Arts and experience with taking care of children would be perfect for the job of the Sea Food Cookery Instructor, and so after a nerve-wracking interview I got the job.

I was ready to leave South Africa to experience the cultures of America, especially Toyon Bay. I said goodbye to my family and off I went. I travelled for 15 hours non-stop to the USA, thinking of what I was going to teach the campers.

I was greeted by Guided Discoveries staff and spent a night at the founders Kristi and Ross Turner’s house. They are amazing, caring, and welcoming people. I am not just saying that because they are the boss, they are genuinely the sweetest people. We took the boat to Catalina Island and off I went to begin my new life at Catalina Sea Camp.

During staff training I got my Sea Food Cookery area ready with a new deep fryer, a new fridge, a new flat top grill, and many more awesome kitchen items. I went snorkeling, kayaking, rock climbing and went on a giant swing. After a week of training the campers arrived. Yay. The joy on the kids faces as well as the instructors was the best view of all.

Today, the campers had guacamole with pita bread, shrimp tempura with noodles, watermelon crush and OREO ICE CREAM! I have been here for more than a month and it has been the best experience yet. Everyone here is amazing. I am so glad I had the courage to come out here to experience this adventure.

Every child should experience the fun and adventure of CIMI Catalina Sea Camp, Toyon Bay.

-Enize Wilson

 

WELCOME TO THE SEA CAMPER BLOG

We would like to thank you for visiting our blog. Catalina Sea Camp is a hands-on marine science program with an emphasis on ocean exploration. Our classes and activities are designed to inspire students toward future success in their academic and personal pursuits. This blog is intended to provide you with up-to-date news and information about our camp programs, as well as current science and ocean happenings. This blog has been created by our staff who have at minimum a Bachelors Degree in Marine Science or related subject. We encourage you to also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Google+, Twitter, and Vine to see even more of our interesting science and ocean information. Feel free to leave comments, questions, or share our blog with others. Please visit www.catalinaseacamp.org for additional information. Happy Reading!

Categories

Archives

Tags